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Internal water storage as a stormwater management tool- design decision effects on hydraulic mixing and nitrogen fate

  • 22 Sep 2021
  • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
  • ONLINE: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85735021355?pwd=TGc1YlllSGxiRWNsbmZUZnp1ckxXQT09
  • 60

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Internal water storage as a stormwater management tool- design decision efforts on hydraulic mixing and nitrogen fate

Presented by: Erica McKenzie, PhD
Associate Professor
- Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Temple University

Full author list:

Authors: Adrienne G. DonaghueΦ, Sarah Beganskas Ϯ, Naomi MorganϮ, Laura ToranϮ, Erica R. McKenzieΦ

Φ  Civil and Environmental Engineering, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA

Ϯ  Earth and Environmental Science, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA

ABSTRACT:

Green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) makes use of passive treatment measures to manage stormwater via storage, infiltration, evapotranspiration.  Internal water storage (IWS) is a below-grade option for additional treatment.  The IWS is created by an underdrain with an elevated outlet, which creates conditions for extended storage under anoxic conditions which can promote denitrification. However, this can be achieved by either an underdrain located at the bottom of the IWS coupled with an upturned elbow (“bottom”), or with the underdrain present at the top of the IWS (“elevated”).The current study uses two-dimensional columns to investigate: 1) how IWS design can impact storage, mixing, and nitrate removal from the IWS, and 2) how organic nitrogen species interact with IWS amendments and impact nitrogen processing in the IWS.  The findings from this study highlight that a bottom underdrain will most effectively remove nitrate, but that organic nitrogen management is more complex. This work highlights the potential for IWS to contribute to nitrogen management, but site-specific factors should be considered during the design process.  

SPEAKER BIOS: 

Erica McKenzie is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Temple University.  Her research group investigates chemical pollutant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems.  Through a combination of mechanistic lab studies, field campaigns, and computational modeling, the McKenzie Environmental Engineering Research Group (MEERG) aims to understand the processes and their implications, with the overarching goal of connecting the science with the engineering design.  MEERG ongoing research projects include stormwater management and PFAS fate, transport, and treatment.

Engineers:

This seminar does qualify for 1.0 Professional Development Hour (PDH). A Certificate of Attendance will be available for AWRA-PMAS members only. The meeting price for non-members who wish to receive a Certificate of Attendance for the PDH is $10.00 ($3.00 for meeting + $7.00 for certificate).  

Please note: Presentation is to be given through Zoom at the link below. PDH's will be issued through PDFs. Please allow extra time to register through Zoom and get software set up. Presentation will start at noon. Early participants will be in a Waiting Room until noon. Participants must email AWRA.PMAS@gmail.com to request PDH Certificate after the event.

Presentation at: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85735021355?pwd=TGc1YlllSGxiRWNsbmZUZnp1ckxXQT09

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